Maggie Galliers, Chair of Learning and Work Institute Company Board

Maggie Galliers was Principal of Leicester College from 2002 to 2012 and was President of the Association of Colleges in 2012/13. Before that, she was Principal of Henley College Coventry for five years, having previously held a wide variety of management positions in further education fields as well as having taught in all sectors of education. She is a member of the Ofqual Board and Chair of City College Coventry. In the past, Maggie has also been a member of the Apprenticeship Task Force, the Further Education Funding Council (FEFC) Quality Assessment Committee, the Quality Improvement Agency (QIA) Board, the National Learning and Skills Council (LSC), the LSC's Young People's Learning Committee and the Higher Education Funding Council for England's (HEFCE) Teaching Quality and Student Experience Committee.

 

Maggie was awarded the CBE for services to local and national further education in the Queen's Birthday Honours List 2009. In 2013 she was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Education by the University of Bedfordshire for her outstanding contribution to further education and support for access and progression to higher education.

Stephen Evans, Chief Executive, Learning and Work Institute

Stephen became Chief Executive of Learning and Work Institute in 2016 after two years as Deputy Chief Executive, where he was responsible for Learning and Work Institute’s research and development work. He joined NIACE (National Institute of Adult Continuing Education), which merged with Inclusion to become Learning & Work Institute, in September 2014.

 

Stephen joined NIACE from Working Links, a leading provider of employment and skills services, where he was responsible for policy, strategy and business development. Prior to this, he worked for the London Development Agency as Director of Employment and Skills, commissioning programmes to support out-of-work Londoners back into jobs and training, and leading the work of the London Skills and Employment Board, chaired by the Mayor.


Before this, Stephen was Chief Economist at the Social Market Foundation, publishing research on a range of public policy areas including health, skills, housing and employment.


This followed six years as Senior Policy Advisor in HM Treasury, in a range of roles leading on policy to cut child poverty, increase employment and boost productivity

Ruth Spellman, Chief Executive of the WEA

For the first time in its 108 year history, the Workers’ Educational Association ( WEA ) appointed a woman as its new Chief Executive in 2012.  Ruth’s career is marked by a commitment to lifelong learning – she was awarded an OBE in 2007 for services to workplace learning and an Honorary Doctorate from Cranfield in 2010.


The WEA is in Ruth’s genes.  Both her grandfather and father lectured for the WEA in the 1930’s and 1950’s, and she, too, was a part-time lecturer for the WEA in the 1970’s.


Among other commitments, Ruth is a Board member of Adviza.

Gina Ebner

Gina Ebner is Secretary General of the European Association for the Education of Adults. She worked as a language trainer in adult education and as a pedagogical manager for a vocational training institute in Austria.

 

She was a project manager at EUROCADRES (Council for European professional and managerial staff), a European trade union organisation. She is also secretary general of the European Civil Society Platform on Lifelong Learning. EAEA represents non-formal adult education with 142 member organisations in 44 countries. EAEA promotes adult learning and access to and participation in non-formal adult education for all, particularly for groups currently under-represented.

Kathleen Henehan

Kathleen Henehan joined the Resolution Foundation in 2017, leading on post-16 skills and education. Prior to joining Resolution, Kathleen worked at Universities UK, where she focused on graduate employment outcomes and learning and teaching policy. She has a PhD in Political Science from the London School of Economics.

David Hagendyk

David was appointed Director for Wales of the Learning and Work Institute in March 2017 and is responsible for leading the work of the organisation in Wales and for promoting to government and service providers the value of adult learning and the need for investment and policies to raise productivity, improve progression from low pay and reduce inequality.

 

He has worked in leadership, campaigning and policy development roles in Wales for the last eighteen years.  Prior to joining Learning and Work Cymru he worked for nearly seven years as the General Secretary of Welsh Labour.

 

Prior to this he worked as the Political Liaison Officer for the University and College Union Cymru, as the Head of Policy for Welsh Labour, and as a researcher for Huw Lewis AM and Lynne Neagle AM.

Joyce Black, Assistant Director Research & Development, Learning and Work Institute

Joyce leads on ‘Life and Society’ across the Institute’s Strategic Plan.


Joyce is the relationship manager for the Department of Education, overseeing the Institute’s annual programme of research and development activities in agreement with DfE policy officials. This also includes leading on the Institute’s role as the UK National Coordinator for the European Agenda for Adult Learning, co-funded by the  European Commission and DfE.

 

Joyce sits on the Executive Board of the European Association for the Education of Adults (EAEA) as Vice President, and on the Executive Committee of the European Basic Skills Network as Chair – both of which the Institute is a member. She is also Chair of the Corporation Board for one of the three Sixth Form Colleges in Leicester.

 

Before joining the Institute, Joyce taught for over 20 years in a further education college, together with senior management responsibilities for learning support.


A great believer in lifelong learning, Joyce is also a qualified Aromatherapist – great for chilling and relaxing.

Colin Neilands

Colin has been involved in adult learning since 1991 when he joined the Workers' Educational Association (Northern Ireland). He worked there for 23 years, rising to become Director in 2008.

 

His initial specialism was in community relations, addressing the divisions of NI through learning. With a passionate belief in collaboration, Colin founded the Forum for Adult Learning NI in 2010. In 2014 Colin went freelance, trading under Communitus - www.communitus.co.uk.

 

He has been the convener of the NI Impact Forum since its inception in Nov 2014 and from May 2015 has worked for EPALE.

Dr Fiona Aldridge, Assistant Director for Research and Development, Learning and Work Institute

Fiona has 20 years’ experience of research, policy and development work in the FE and skills sector and provides leadership and quality assurance across L&W’s R&D programmes.

 

She is currently working across a range of policy areas, including traineeships, apprenticeships,  technical  education and advanced learner loans, with a particular focus on building the capacity of the sector to lead and respond to changes in post-16 education and skills.

Professor Tom Schuller

Professor Tom Schuller is the author The Paula Principle – how and why women work below their competence level, published by Scribe in March 2017.  Tom has worked in adult education most of his professional life, in various capacities. He is the author and editor of some 20 books, on topics from adult learning to industrial democracy. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences.


Tom was the principal editor of the 3rd GRALE report – the Global Report on Adult Learning published in 2016 by Unesco’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

 

From 2008-2010 he directed the independent Inquiry into the Future for Lifelong Learning, sponsored by the UK’s National Institute of Adult and Continuing Education, and co-authored the Inquiry’s main report, Learning Through Life.


From 2003-2008 he was Head of the Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI) at OECD, the Paris-based international think tank, with responsibility for CERI’s projects relating to some 30 countries.


Before that Tom was Dean of the Faculty of Continuing Education and Professor of Lifelong Learning at Birkbeck, University of London; and co-director of the Research Centre on the Wider Benefits of Learning.  

 

He chairs the Governing Board of the Working Men’s College in London, Europe’s oldest adult education institute.

Werner Mauch, Senior Programme Specialist, UIL

Werner Mauch is a Senior Programme Specialist at the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning (UIL) in Hamburg, Germany. He is responsible for the coordination of UIL’s adult learning and education (ALE) programme with its focus on the follow-up of the Sixth International Conference on Adult Education (CONFINTEA VI, 2009). Preparing the CONFINTEA VI Mid-Term Review, which takes place in Suwon, Republic of Korea, from 25 to 27 October, is his foremost concern at the moment.


He has an MA in adult education from the University of Bremen (Germany) and a degree in business administration from the Vocational College (Berufsakademie) of Mannheim (Germany). Working at UIL since 1993, he has been responsible for coordinating the revision of the 1976 Recommendation on the Development of Adult Education, resulting in the 2015 Recommendation on Adult Learning and Education, as well as for a series of UIL research and development projects and activities, including Innovations in Adult Education, World Trends in Adult Education Research, Adult Education and Literacy for Migrants and Synergies between Formal and Non-Formal Education Approaches in HIV/AIDS Prevention. He has published a range of publications on adult and lifelong learning, mainly resulting from these UIL activities.

Anthony Painter

Anthony Painter leads the award winning Action and Research Centre at the Royal Society of Arts, and its three teams focusing on economy, education, public services and communities.


His own research focuses on a range of policy issues including the impact of new technology on the economy and society and institutional change.


He is author of three books, most recently 'Left without a future? Social Justice in anxious times' and a number of high impact policy and research reports such as “Creative citizen, creative state: the principled and pragmatic case for a Universal Basic Income”. Anthony's Twitter feed is @anthonypainter.

Maggie Galliers, Chair of Learning and Work Institute Company Board

Maggie Galliers was Principal of Leicester College from 2002 to 2012 and was President of the Association of Colleges in 2012/13. Before that, she was Principal of Henley College Coventry for five years, having previously held a wide variety of management positions in further education fields as well as having taught in all sectors of education. She is a member of the Ofqual Board and Chair of City College Coventry. In the past, Maggie has also been a member of the Apprenticeship Task Force, the Further Education Funding Council (FEFC) Quality Assessment Committee, the Quality Improvement Agency (QIA) Board, the National Learning and Skills Council (LSC), the LSC's Young People's Learning Committee and the Higher Education Funding Council for England's (HEFCE) Teaching Quality and Student Experience Committee.

 

Maggie was awarded the CBE for services to local and national further education in the Queen's Birthday Honours List 2009. In 2013 she was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Education by the University of Bedfordshire for her outstanding contribution to further education and support for access and progression to higher education.

Stephen Evans, Chief Executive, Learning and Work Institute

Stephen became Chief Executive of Learning and Work Institute in 2016 after two years as Deputy Chief Executive, where he was responsible for Learning and Work Institute’s research and development work. He joined NIACE (National Institute of Adult Continuing Education), which merged with Inclusion to become Learning & Work Institute, in September 2014.

 

Stephen joined NIACE from Working Links, a leading provider of employment and skills services, where he was responsible for policy, strategy and business development. Prior to this, he worked for the London Development Agency as Director of Employment and Skills, commissioning programmes to support out-of-work Londoners back into jobs and training, and leading the work of the London Skills and Employment Board, chaired by the Mayor.


Before this, Stephen was Chief Economist at the Social Market Foundation, publishing research on a range of public policy areas including health, skills, housing and employment.


This followed six years as Senior Policy Advisor in HM Treasury, in a range of roles leading on policy to cut child poverty, increase employment and boost productivity

Ruth Spellman, Chief Executive of the WEA

For the first time in its 108 year history, the Workers’ Educational Association ( WEA ) appointed a woman as its new Chief Executive in 2012.  Ruth’s career is marked by a commitment to lifelong learning – she was awarded an OBE in 2007 for services to workplace learning and an Honorary Doctorate from Cranfield in 2010.


The WEA is in Ruth’s genes.  Both her grandfather and father lectured for the WEA in the 1930’s and 1950’s, and she, too, was a part-time lecturer for the WEA in the 1970’s.


Among other commitments, Ruth is a Board member of Adviza.

Gina Ebner

Gina Ebner is Secretary General of the European Association for the Education of Adults. She worked as a language trainer in adult education and as a pedagogical manager for a vocational training institute in Austria.

 

She was a project manager at EUROCADRES (Council for European professional and managerial staff), a European trade union organisation. She is also secretary general of the European Civil Society Platform on Lifelong Learning. EAEA represents non-formal adult education with 142 member organisations in 44 countries. EAEA promotes adult learning and access to and participation in non-formal adult education for all, particularly for groups currently under-represented.

Kathleen Henehan

Kathleen Henehan joined the Resolution Foundation in 2017, leading on post-16 skills and education. Prior to joining Resolution, Kathleen worked at Universities UK, where she focused on graduate employment outcomes and learning and teaching policy. She has a PhD in Political Science from the London School of Economics.

Joyce Black, Assistant Director Research & Development, Learning and Work Institute

Joyce leads on ‘Life and Society’ across the Institute’s Strategic Plan.


Joyce is the relationship manager for the Department of Education, overseeing the Institute’s annual programme of research and development activities in agreement with DfE policy officials. This also includes leading on the Institute’s role as the UK National Coordinator for the European Agenda for Adult Learning, co-funded by the  European Commission and DfE.

 

Joyce sits on the Executive Board of the European Association for the Education of Adults (EAEA) as Vice President, and on the Executive Committee of the European Basic Skills Network as Chair – both of which the Institute is a member. She is also Chair of the Corporation Board for one of the three Sixth Form Colleges in Leicester.

 

Before joining the Institute, Joyce taught for over 20 years in a further education college, together with senior management responsibilities for learning support.


A great believer in lifelong learning, Joyce is also a qualified Aromatherapist – great for chilling and relaxing.

David Hagendyk

David was appointed Director for Wales of the Learning and Work Institute in March 2017 and is responsible for leading the work of the organisation in Wales and for promoting to government and service providers the value of adult learning and the need for investment and policies to raise productivity, improve progression from low pay and reduce inequality.

 

He has worked in leadership, campaigning and policy development roles in Wales for the last eighteen years.  Prior to joining Learning and Work Cymru he worked for nearly seven years as the General Secretary of Welsh Labour.

 

Prior to this he worked as the Political Liaison Officer for the University and College Union Cymru, as the Head of Policy for Welsh Labour, and as a researcher for Huw Lewis AM and Lynne Neagle AM.

Colin Neilands

Colin has been involved in adult learning since 1991 when he joined the Workers' Educational Association (Northern Ireland). He worked there for 23 years, rising to become Director in 2008.

 

His initial specialism was in community relations, addressing the divisions of NI through learning. With a passionate belief in collaboration, Colin founded the Forum for Adult Learning NI in 2010. In 2014 Colin went freelance, trading under Communitus - www.communitus.co.uk.

 

He has been the convener of the NI Impact Forum since its inception in Nov 2014 and from May 2015 has worked for EPALE.

Dr Fiona Aldridge, Assistant Director for Research and Development, Learning and Work Institute

Fiona has 20 years’ experience of research, policy and development work in the FE and skills sector and provides leadership and quality assurance across L&W’s R&D programmes.

 

She is currently working across a range of policy areas, including traineeships, apprenticeships,  technical  education and advanced learner loans, with a particular focus on building the capacity of the sector to lead and respond to changes in post-16 education and skills.

Professor Tom Schuller

Professor Tom Schuller is the author The Paula Principle – how and why women work below their competence level, published by Scribe in March 2017.  Tom has worked in adult education most of his professional life, in various capacities. He is the author and editor of some 20 books, on topics from adult learning to industrial democracy. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences.


Tom was the principal editor of the 3rd GRALE report – the Global Report on Adult Learning published in 2016 by Unesco’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

 

From 2008-2010 he directed the independent Inquiry into the Future for Lifelong Learning, sponsored by the UK’s National Institute of Adult and Continuing Education, and co-authored the Inquiry’s main report, Learning Through Life.


From 2003-2008 he was Head of the Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI) at OECD, the Paris-based international think tank, with responsibility for CERI’s projects relating to some 30 countries.


Before that Tom was Dean of the Faculty of Continuing Education and Professor of Lifelong Learning at Birkbeck, University of London; and co-director of the Research Centre on the Wider Benefits of Learning.  

 

He chairs the Governing Board of the Working Men’s College in London, Europe’s oldest adult education institute.

Werner Mauch, Senior Programme Specialist, UIL

Werner Mauch is a Senior Programme Specialist at the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning (UIL) in Hamburg, Germany. He is responsible for the coordination of UIL’s adult learning and education (ALE) programme with its focus on the follow-up of the Sixth International Conference on Adult Education (CONFINTEA VI, 2009). Preparing the CONFINTEA VI Mid-Term Review, which takes place in Suwon, Republic of Korea, from 25 to 27 October, is his foremost concern at the moment.


He has an MA in adult education from the University of Bremen (Germany) and a degree in business administration from the Vocational College (Berufsakademie) of Mannheim (Germany). Working at UIL since 1993, he has been responsible for coordinating the revision of the 1976 Recommendation on the Development of Adult Education, resulting in the 2015 Recommendation on Adult Learning and Education, as well as for a series of UIL research and development projects and activities, including Innovations in Adult Education, World Trends in Adult Education Research, Adult Education and Literacy for Migrants and Synergies between Formal and Non-Formal Education Approaches in HIV/AIDS Prevention. He has published a range of publications on adult and lifelong learning, mainly resulting from these UIL activities.

Anthony Painter

Anthony Painter leads the award winning Action and Research Centre at the Royal Society of Arts, and its three teams focusing on economy, education, public services and communities.


His own research focuses on a range of policy issues including the impact of new technology on the economy and society and institutional change.


He is author of three books, most recently 'Left without a future? Social Justice in anxious times' and a number of high impact policy and research reports such as “Creative citizen, creative state: the principled and pragmatic case for a Universal Basic Income”. Anthony's Twitter feed is @anthonypainter.

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